Pesto Recipes

Pesto originates from northern Italy, and its means "to pound or to crush," similar to the English word pestle, referring to the muddled herbs and garlic that make up the sauce. Traditionally, pesto is prepared in a mortar and pestle, but in most modern recipes it is pureed until chunky in a blender or food processor. The basic components of classic pesto include fresh basil leaves, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts, and usually Parmesan cheese. In other parts of Italy, pine nuts and cheese are omitted from the sauce. To read more about pesto click here or to view one of a pesto recipe click a link from the listing below:

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About Pesto

Pesto originates from northern Italy, and its means "to pound or to crush," similar to the English word pestle, referring to the muddled herbs and garlic that make up the sauce. Traditionally, pesto is prepared in a mortar and pestle, but in most modern recipes it is pureed until chunky in a blender or food processor. The basic components of classic pesto include fresh basil leaves, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts, and usually Parmesan cheese. In other parts of Italy, pine nuts and cheese are omitted from the sauce.

Variations of pesto can include any fresh herb in lieu of basil, such as parsley, cilantro, or mint. Seasonings such as lemon juice or zest may be added, and other vegetables may be pureed into the sauce, such as green peas or sun-dried tomatoes. Liquid seasonings like vinegars, juices, and extracts can also be added to create custom pesto blends.

There are a wide variety of uses for a pesto sauce. Freshly made pesto can be refrigerated and used for up to a week, while frozen pesto will keep for several months at a time. Pesto is excellent used as a pasta sauce, created by merely adding liquid to the sauce, such as wine, stock, or additional oil. Similarly, pesto can be made into a salad dressing by thinning out the consistency and tossing with fresh vegetables. For a healthier sandwich, smear pesto onto whole grain bread and layer with roasted vegetables and cheese. And spread pesto atop any meat dish, especially grilled lamb, steak, or chicken, which all hold up well against the light herbaceous flavors of pesto.

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